Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Explaining Pictures to a Dead Hare



In 1965, The German conceptual artist, Joseph Beuys, performed a piece entitled ‘Explaining pictures to a dead hare’. It took place on the opening night of Beuys’ exhibition of drawings at Galerie Alfred Schmela in Düsseldorf. The invited public arrived at the gallery to find the doors locked. Through the glass front of the gallery they saw Beuys sitting in a chair with his face covered in honey and gold leaf, cradling a dead hare in his arms. Slowly he got up and wandered around the exhibition, as if explaining each work to the hare.

The connection between one of the great artists of the 20th century and co founder of Die Gruenen-The German Green Party and the rather less intellectually endowed brethren of the Scottish Gamekeepers Society and their Landowner/Sporting Estate employers, might appear tenuous to say the least. But here’s the thing; for Beuys and for many who spend their time in the mountains and uplands, the hare is simply a magical animal. The sight of which, exploding into life on the hillside, encapsulates the very essence of the wilderness experience. For Joseph Bueys it was one of the six sacred animals which informed his art. Certainly, the sighting of a hare on the open uplands near here-particularly in the early summer when its tawny coat stands out from the young green sward-always raises the spirit. Inevitably, the first sight of a car or bike trundling over the high road over the open mountain expanses, sparks the skittish hare into action. Literally haring off into the blue beyond.


Inevitably it will be a single hare. Unlike their fellow members of the Leporidae family, the populous and sociable rabbit, hares tend to be loners. Outside of their breeding season in spring they are usually to be seen on their own. Nibbling the vegetation or scanning the skies for buzzards and the fields for foxes.Those powerful hind legs, cocked and ready for flight in the blink of an eye.

For those who love the hare, the past few years has been a highly depressing period as across the Scottish countryside, particularly the the grouse shooting moorlands, hares are being slaughtered in their tens of thousands. Photographs show grinning imbeciles in waxed jackets and flat caps, proudly posing behind their prey. A bloodied carpet of white hares laid out before them. The excuses used by the landowner associations and sporting estates which drive the slaughter range from the need to cull the hare to prevent a population explosion to the unfounded belief that hares carry ticks which spread disease to the precious grouse. However,  Dr Adam Watson, a mountain ecologist and author has described the situation as  "a preventable catastrophe’ and ‘a national scandal."

Professor Watson who has published a book on mammals in the northeast Highlands highlights the unique the plight of the mountain hare which has  ‘suffered massive declines over the last 10 to 20 years’. "I would say that spring abundance of adults has been reduced by at least five-fold to 100-fold on most of these moors," he said. ‘In some areas, hares have been completely wiped out.’ Chillingly he adds "Gamekeepers on several estates have told me they were instructed to reduce hare numbers and to try to eradicate them."

While estate goon squads carry out their bloody work on behalf of their profit driven employers, the Scottish government’s wildlife conservation agency, Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), which is charged with protecting the nations wildlife, has been depressingly supine towards the landed interests and decidedly hands off on the issue. 

Image: Raptor Persecution Scotland

The issue has certainly produced strong feelings of outrage in the outdoor community with people like leading climber Dave Macleod recently tweeting a photo of estate workers carting their bloody bounty over the empty moorland killing fields. At this moment, there is no sign of the slaughter coming to and end anytime soon. Perhaps given the general public's distaste for the practice, Scottish Natural Heritage might finally do what they are supposed to do and protect this important element of the upland ecosystem. Then again, given their record of inactivity, perhaps not?
 
Apparently,in Irish and Scottish myth and folklore,the hare is often associated with the Sidh. A supernatural race whose activities inform early Pagan belief systems. In these stories, characters who harm hares often suffer dreadful consequences.’....Let's hope so!!!

 

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