Thursday, October 19, 2017

The Crag at the end of the World



Worlds End -Craig y Forwen
It must be at least twenty years since I visited World’s End. The delightfully situated limestone crag at the head of the beautiful. Eglwsyg Valley in North East Wales. It was one of my regular haunts when I started climbing in the 80‘s and Stuart Cathcart’s little Cicerone guidebook- Clwyd Limestone was my bible. It was a great crag to roll up to for an evening session. Offering short, single pitch routes of all standards on three tiers of cliff which rose up from the sylvan ravine like an enchanted castle. Thinking about it, many of those little limestone venues were pretty stunning in their locations. Pot Hole Quarry, Maeshafn, Pandy Outcrop-not limestone more a granite crag but popular with NE Wales climbers all the same.

Then there were the impressive Eglwsyg cliffs themselves; Craig Arthur, Dinbren, Twilight Towers, Pinfold and further east to the popular Trevor Rocks. I only climbed once at Craig Arthur- surely the biggest limestone cliff in north Wales apart from the Ormes on the coast?- but I remember it being pretty intimidating place. I well recall climbing Swalbr, named after a track on 60‘s supergroup, Cream’s Disraeli Gears album, and the first pitch which I led re-defined to term ‘chossy’ ! It was pretty nerve wracking, tossing every other hold over my shoulder! Thankfully the ‘out there’ final corner pitch was pretty wild although I’ll admit to grasping the final hold like a drowning man clutching at a lifebuoy.

The upper reaches of Eglwsyg Valley: Abandon hope all ye who seek to park here'
What struck me this time on my visit, was the fact that despite the valley being a pretty spectacular,with the great pale crags rising high up above the narrow lane, which weaves its way towards World’s End -or Craig y Forwen to give its original name- through woodland tinged with early autumnal colours and fields dotted with the ubiquitous small Welsh ewes, was the pitiful lack of parking hereabouts. Despite the fact that the valley lends itself to so many outdoor activities, including rock climbing, hill walking and mountain biking, the landowners and political powers that be have conspired to make the area as unwelcoming as possible. Every gate is marked ‘Private Land-Keep Out’ and there is absolutely nowhere you can park in the valley.

Around the time I stopped coming to the valley and World’s End, word came back that a new landowner had taken over the estate who turned out to be...what’s the word I’m looking for?..Oh Yes...A Twat! The traditional parking area under World’s End was blocked off and draconian parking restrictions kicked in. Furthermore, a compliant local council marked all the lay-bys along the valley and beneath the crag as ‘Passing Areas-No Parking’ restrictive. You can in fact carry on up the hill and pass beyond the estate and walk back but overall, the parking hereabouts, is redolent of the restrictions at The Roaches in Staffordshire.

The whole thing I’ve got to say is typical of the small minded parochialism of north Wales local politics and policing. With Freemasonry rife amongst local politicians, North Wales police hierarchy and landowners, little wonder feudalism is alive and well in North Wales. Imagine if the Eglwysg Valley was in the Lake District? I’m pretty sure its rich potential would be appreciated and exploited by landowners and politicos alike, and parking areas would be created, trails opened up and visitors welcomed. Instead of being met with brutal ‘Private- Keep Out’ signs every few metres.

80's Bible
So...The valley is stunning in every way and well worth a visit; just don’t expect the locals to be keeping 'a welcome in the hillsides'!
 

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